Vitamin D Could Decrease Risk of Fracture

There is an article that was published in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine that states girls can have less of a risk of bone fractures by taking vitamin D. This is true even for girls involved in high-impact, physical activities. Many times in physical activities, stress fractures can occur. These happen when the bone cannot handle the force and/or pressure that are occurring to it. This type of fractures do not have to happen all at once they can happen over a period of time, so when these first start it might not be noticeable. However, after so many stress fractures happen it can cause issues in the structure of the bone.

The authors of this article were Kendrin Rc Sc.D., R.D. and colleagues from Children's Hospital Boston. They stated while the ongoing theory is that diets high in calcium attained from through consuming dairy products are effective at making bones strong and healthy. However, through a background study, this theory does not always stand true.

Healthy ChildrenResearchers examined over 6,100 girls from ages 9 to 15 years of age with the Growing Up Today Study. They followed the girls for more than 7 years and about 4% of these girls had stress fractures occur, with no link to their intake of calcium or dairy. However, vitamin D seems to have been an important part of maintaining strong enough bones that would stand up under high impact activities, especially with the girls that were physically active at least one or more hours a day.

The conclusion that the authors came to was that adolescents should increase their daily intake of vitamin D to 600IU/d as suggested by the Institute of Medicine's report recently issued. Further research is needed to verify these fact and if boys would show the same results.

Selected References

Vitamin D Intake May Reduce Fracture Risk In Girls